Posts tagged ‘process’

Think Summer, Think Fordham

I was super excited when Fordham University asked me to create an illustrated headline for their Summer 2016 program. The tagline is “Think Summer, Think Fordham” and will be used on all the marketing materials for next year’s session.

They were really fun to work with, giving me a lot of creative freedom with how to interpret the slogan and represent both city and academics in a fun way. Here are a few of my sketches along with the final piece.

Thanks to AD, Maggie Coyne, for the fun collaboration!

 

FordhamSummerSession

ThinkSummer_Fordham_SK_E ThinkSummer_Fordham_SK_D ThinkSummer_Fordham_SK_C ThinkSummer_Fordham_SK_B ThinkSummer_Fordham_SK_A

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The cutting room floor…

I don’t think most people realize how many versions a book cover goes through before it becomes the final product they see on the shelf. Designing a book cover is a very collaborative process, and though it can also be a very challenging and loooong process at times—it’s always fascinating to see the evolution. Often, a designer’s best or favorite concepts are not the ones that make the final cut, so it’s fun to share what was left behind.

Here’s a recent cover I did for Egmont. Another opportunity to mix my own illustration and lettering into the design, I dove right in and really enjoyed hammering out these first comps.

GetHappyCOMPS

Ultimately, the publisher preferred a more commercial photographic approach, but I was still able to incorporate a whimsical illustration into the final cover:

GetHappy_CVR_HR

This is Mary Amato’s second YA novel, and is available for pre-order on Amazon.

 

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New year, new book covers

Excited to start the new year off with a fun new project to share! I designed & illustrated the paperback cover of This Journal Belongs To Ratchet for Sourcebooks. A middle-grade novel from award-winning author Nancy Cavanaugh, it’s the empowering story of a girl trying to find her own definition of “normal”, as told through her journal of home-school assignments.

The story and format immediately inspired me, and I thought it would be a perfect design project to bring my illustration style & hand-lettering to.

The team at Sourcebooks is always really fantastic and open to my ideas, so I jumped into comps exploring a few illustrated directions. In the book, Ratchet is home-schooled by her mechanic father, whom she is embarrassed by at the start of the book but learns to appreciate & embrace. So the tools seemed like a great element to incorporate—both symbolic & representational, while lending to alot of fun graphic solutions.

RatchetCOMPS

They were well-received overall, but ultimately we went with the bottom left direction. A few color tweaks made it a bit more appealing to the girl audience, and I had a ball illustrating each letterform in the title. Here’s the final cover, officially on sale May 1, 2014 but available for preorder on Amazon now.

Ratchet_CVR

 

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Let’s Go Camping, Baby!

I’m a bit behind with this post, but still wanted to share my assignment from last week for Lilla Rogers’ class. We explored the Baby Apparel market, which is a new territory for me. My work is a somewhat whimsical and kid-friendly, but I haven’t ever specifically created work for the baby market. Lilla’s also teaching us the importance of creating work from separate icons, which is a bit of a different approach for me. So, in a really fun challenge, we were to create a design and a few coordinates with a “camping” theme that could be applied to textiles and other baby apparel. I tried to push myself to simplify imagery to would read graphically and translate to various formats while still keeping the quality of my natural style. I had a lot of fun with this, especially with color palette and creating the coordinate patterns. A few images here of the process, sketches, and final presentation.

BP_MATS_wk2_baby01 BP_MATS_wk2_Baby02 BP_MATS_wk2_Baby03 BP_MATS_wk2_baby04 BP_MATS_wk2_baby05

 

 

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Autumn in New York

In my nearly 10 years of living in New York City, Autumn has become my favorite season. The slight chill on a sunny day, the crisp evening air, and the bustling people out and about fills my whole heart with excitement—almost like I am seeing the city with fresh eyes each September. I created this little image as a new promotional piece for my Facebook artist page, and as an opportunity to experiment a bit with technique. I played with watercolor and gouache washes with my line work, and old linocuts to overprint the leaves. The hand-lettered text come from the lyrics to one of my favorite Billie Holiday songs—a classic, celebrating this amazing time of year.

 

FBcvr_Autumn

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Some fun experimentation

I’ve been thinking about process and development a lot in my work lately.

A couple months ago, I had my portfolio reviewed by Charles Hively (Art Director and Publisher of 3×3 Magazine). His great professional feedback, and just having a fresh eye look at my work, was a re-energizing experience for me. I think it’s easy for anyone to lose sight of their work and the direction it’s going if there’s never a moment to reflect on it or consider it from a more objective angle. I think for me especially—since I juggle a creative full-time job where I design and art direct illustrators every day—what I am doing in my own work can feel clouded and even over-influenced by what I am constantly surrounded by. And the pressure I put on myself by comparing what I do to what I see, and trying to “speed up” to get to where I really want to be in my career, has created a lot of burn out and frustration for me.

Mr. Hively’s feedback suggested that I spend (a lot of) time figuring out how to allow more of my personal voice to shine through, as any artist has to do to really improve: Try new mediums, palettes, and/or subject matter; Study non-illustration & design work; Look at European illustration; Tap into the things that most interest & inspire me on a personal level—and let all these influences find their appropriate place in my work until that day when I “get goosebumps” because I’ll just know I’ll have found that really special thing in my work that sets it apart from everything else.

I agree that growth comes from stepping out of the “safe” zone, and I’ve been trying to slow down in a way —thinking less about “finished pieces” when I make new work and get more involved in my process. I took advantage of the extra time away from the office grind this long holiday weekend to experiment a bit with medium and process.

I love music and also love illustrating & hand-lettering quotes that inspire me. These words by Bilie Holiday seemed especially fitting for the things I’m thinking about at the moment, so I decided to revisit this drawing I’d done awhile back. Here’s some shots of  my  process:

Transfer

Original drawing and inkjet transfer to toothed paper

Colorblocking

Blocking in color with watercolor & goauche

WIP

Final art with inked line

Bille_HR

Digitized art

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Custom Wedding Illustration

A dear friend of mine got married last weekend, and I created a custom wedding illustration as a gift.

I’ve been experimenting a bit—getting back to combining more traditional mediums, like watercolor & gouache, with my linework.

Here’s a few shots of the process:

Drawing

Rough sketchbook drawing

sketch

Sketch transfer to Canson Cold Press Acrylic paper

colorblocking

Color blocking with gouache

WIP

Work-in-Progress with metallic gold accents added

FinalArt

Final painting with inked line

detail

Detail

Framed

Framed for gift-giving (the happy couple loved it!)

Wedding_FINAL

Digitized image

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New book cover design & Illustration

Very excited that I can finally share a project I worked on last year—a book cover for Lindsay Eland’s new middle-grade novel for Egmont Books. I love projects like this, where I had the opportunity to create the whole package: design, illustration, and hand-lettering.

This is the story of Sunday Fowler, who’s feels she’s always overlooked in her family as the third of six kids. So she’s determined to spend the summer finding a way to make herself stand out, and may have just found it in the mysterious letters she finds in a silver box in the basement of the library her parents are renovating. She’s determined to find out who wrote them, in hopes to unveil to the world what may be a lost novel—and become famous!


Summer of Sundays book cover

I tried several different approaches in the sketch rounds, but ultimately we decided to focus on conveying the sense of mystery as well as Sunday’s determination.

Summer of Sundays Sketches

I previously worked on Lindsay’s debut middle grade novel, Scones and Sensibility. It’s such a joy to work on her books—her writing is delightfully sweet & fun. A Summer of Sundays pubs in July and is now available for pre-order on Amazon.

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Book cover character illustrations

I recently had a great opportunity to work with Scholastic on a really fun book cover job. It was for a sweet chapter book series, featuring a little girl with some big personality! So I was able to jump into some character development; Here’s some of the sketches and the color piece I submitted for final.

First character sketches

Rough sketches in layout

Revised character sketches with rough color

Final art

Unfortunately, they ultimately decided on a different look for the series, so my art was killed. But I really loved exploring this character, so I’m hoping to work on more projects like this! Thanks to the Art Director, Natalie, for thinking of me for this one!

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